4 April 2016

Author Q&A Session #60: With Paula Treick DeBoard


Welcome my dear readers,

Today Paula Treick DeBoard is in an all new author interview session, where she is going to talk about her new book, The Drowning Girls, her life as an author and many more things.
Scroll below to know more about this talented and skilled author.

Read the review of The Drowning Girls




Me: Hello and welcome to my blog, Paula. Congratulations on your new book, The Drowning Girls. How will you express your feelings about this book that has already won the hearts of so many readers?

Paula: Thanks, Aditi! I’ve been thrilled at the reception so far for The Drowning Girls. This is my third novel, but it’s still a bit nerve-wracking when the book goes out to readers for the first time. As I was writing, I found myself getting sucked more and more into the world of Liz and Phil and the secrets they were hiding. I hope readers have the same experience.


Me: What inspired you to write this thriller? Did you travel extensively for the purpose of research?

Paula: I had an idea for a crime that happened within an exclusive community, and I let the idea percolate for a while before it all came together. The book is set in the Livermore, California area, which is about 45 minutes from where I live. It wasn’t necessary for me to travel far, but I did spend some time in the area getting inspiration and drawing on particular landmarks.


Me: How did you research for this story line?

Paula: Most of my research was of the online variety. I did some research on architecture and high-end home furnishings, and I watched a lot of mountain lion videos (as a mountain lion does make an appearance in this story). Mostly, writing this book required me to think about each of the characters, their motivations and their relationships with each other. It was a bit like living with a fictional village in my head.


Me: Tell us one trait of your main characters, Liz and Phil that intrigues you the most.

Paula: This is a great question! Liz and Phil are both characters who make some pretty serious mistakes and poor decisions, but I like that they are both trying—in the wrong way at times—to do the right thing. Or they are doing the wrong thing in the moment, hoping that eventually things work out for the better. I think Liz is like many mothers who have teenage daughters, in that she doesn’t want her child to grow up and lose her innocence. If she could, Liz would control more aspects of Danielle’s life. That’s understandable, but not always such a good thing.


Me: How will you describe your journey so far as an author?

Paula: I’ve been writing since I was old enough to hold a pencil, but it wasn’t until 2010 that I realized writing could be a professional calling for me, too. I’ve developed a lot of discipline as a writer—I make time for it and schedule my day around the writing I need to do, rather than “finding time,” which didn’t always happen.

When my first novel, The Mourning Hours, came out, I was at a reading where someone asked, “What’s been the best thing about having your book published?” And I had to answer honestly: everything has been the best thing. It was a thrill to find an agent to represent me and an editor who understands my writing process and pushes me even farther. It’s been amazing to connect with readers across various platforms as well. Not long ago, I walked into a coffee shop and spotted a woman reading my book. I wish my twenty-two-year-old self could have had a glimpse of that moment. The journey hasn’t been without its ups and downs, but overall—it’s been amazing.


Me: Was it always your one true dream to be an author?

Paula: Yes—although it took me a long time to admit that this was really my dream. I grew up in a family of word lovers, and even while I was writing my own stories and poems, it felt audacious to think that others would want to read something I wrote. These days I meet a lot of people who have similar dreams and seem to be on the fence about fully committing to them. Writing is difficult, and the discipline it takes is immense—but it is also incredibly rewarding. I hope to encourage others to follow this dream.


Me: What other passions do you have apart from writing?

Paula: I’ve been a teacher since 2001, and I love that I get to share my passion for literature and writing with my students every day. These days I’m a lecturer in writing at the University of California, Merced. My biggest successes come when students tell me that they now feel more confident as writers, or that a book we’ve read has opened their eyes to a new aspect of our world.
I’m fortunate that my husband, Will, is such a creative person—we share a number of hobbies, such as being in a film club and on a trivia team. Also, we both love animals and our house sometimes feels like a mini-zoo, with our two dogs and a cat.


Me: What do you do to get away from the stress of writing?

Paula: I love to travel at every available opportunity, even if it’s just a quick trip to San Francisco to explore for a day. I also read constantly—that’s a form of travel, too. Since I have a commute to the university, I fill that time with audiobooks. It’s a relief to know there’s always a good book waiting for me! Also—I’m aware that this probably sounds strange—I get out a lot of pleasure out of the everyday routine, walking the dogs, gardening in our backyard and tinkering with little home improvement projects. If I have a few spare minutes and an Internet connection, I’m usually browsing Pinterest.


Me: What's next up on your writing sleeves? Please tell us briefly about it.

Paula: I’m in the middle of a first draft for my next book. It’s about a woman trying to hide something that happened in her past, nearly twenty years ago. When an unexpected series of events propels her into the national spotlight, those secrets come bubbling to the surface.


Me: Thanks Paula for joining me today on this interview session. I wish you luck for all your future endeavors.

Paula: Thank you, Aditi! It’s been my pleasure.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Paula's Bio:


Paula Treick DeBoard is a writer, latte drinker and all-around slave to public education. Her first novels—written in the back seat of a 1977 Chevy Caprice station wagon where her parents let her jostle around, unprotected by a seatbelt—were sadly lost in one cross-country move or another.
The Mourning Hours (2013) was her first novel to survive. Paula is also the author of The Fragile World (2014) and The Drowning Girls (April 2016).
She holds a BA in English from Dordt College and an MFA in Fiction from the University of Southern Maine. She breaks up the monotony of staring at her laptop screen for long hours with her teaching commitment as a lecturer in the Merritt Writing Program at the University of California, Merced.
Her heart—and any remaining spare time—belongs to Will and their four-legged brood.





 Connect with Paula on: Website Facebook Twitter

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Thanks for your feedback!